How To Clean a Bathroom Exhaust Fan

The most efficient tips on how to clean a bathroom exhaust fan.

how to clean a bathroom exhaust fanTAB62/SHUTTERSTOCK

As you tackle your bathroom cleaning checklist, there’s one more chore you might want to add—the exhaust fan. In fact, it’s more important than you might think to know how to clean a bathroom exhaust fan. That little fan helps get rid of odors, reduces moisture in the air and can even remove airborne contaminates from household cleaning chemicals. A dirty fan covered in dust doesn’t work efficiently. And if your exhaust fan is on the fritz, excess moisture has no where to go—which eventually will lead to mold and mildew. So here’s the plan—don’t neglect that fan. Give it a good cleaning about every six months. Read on to find out how to thoroughly clean your bathroom exhaust fan, but first turn off the fan at the circuit breaker for safety. Then you’re ready to get started.

How Do You Remove a Bathroom Vent Cover?

To remove the cover, gently pull down on the cover to expose the fan; then squeeze the metal mounting wires on either side and slide them out of their slots. This will allow the cover to be completely removed from the fan housing. Now you can see the amount of dust and grime you are dealing with, and get to work.

Clean the Vent Cover with Soapy Water

Cleaning the cover is simple. Fill up your bathroom sink with warm water and a few drops of dish soap. Allow the cover to soak in the soapy water for a few minutes. Then scrub the fan cover with a cloth or dish brush removing all dirt, dust and grime. Place the cover on a towel and allow it to air dry while you move on to the next step—cleaning the fan.

Use a Vacuum to Get Rid of Dust on the Exhaust Fan

Before you touch the exhaust fan, unplug the standard two-prong plug that powers the fan. If you want to be extra cautious, you can turn the power off to the bathroom at the circuit breaker. Once you’re certain there is no electricity to the fan, you can safely clean it. Start by removing dust with a vacuum extension wand and attachments. For the fan motor components and fan housing, use a bristle brush dusting attachment. For the more narrow and hard to reach areas, use the crevice attachment. Maintain a light touch so you don’t damage anything.

Remove Grime with a Damp Cloth

Once the dry dust is removed, you’ll probably notice the exhaust fan is still dirty with built-up grime. Take a damp microfiber cloth and wipe down the fan components and housing to remove any remaining dirt. Looking to perform an extra deep clean? Don’t be afraid to further disassemble the fan. Depending on your model, remove any visible screws and remove the motor from the fan housing. Clean the fan blades and surrounding motor parts with the damp microfiber cloth.

Reassemble the Exhaust Fan

With a clean fan and a cover that looks like new, it’s time to put the fan back together. If you removed the motor, now is the time to put it back in place and replace the screws. Next, plug in the fan to restore power. Then put the cover back on by inserting the mounting wires back into their slots, and gently push the cover into place. Now that you know how to clean a bathroom exhaust fan,

Erica Young is a freelance writer and content creator, specializing in home and lifestyle pieces. She loves writing about home decor, organization, relationships, and pop culture. She holds a bachelor's degree in Journalism and Mass Communication.
Read more...

15 Trees You Should Never Grow in Your Yard

Read more...

Tips for Painting Kitchen Cabinets

 

The best choices for cabinet paints

Paint options for painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets brightens a shabby kitchen. Choose an oil-based paint or a water-borne acrylic enamel. Both create tough, durable surfaces.

best paint for cabinetsFAMILY HANDYMAN

Prime before painting

If you want to give new life to old wooden kitchen cabinets, painting is a great choice. You have several good paint options. Before painting, a careful sanding and good primer set the stage for a smooth, durable top coat for painting kitchen cabinets. For the best adhesion and a harder, more durable finish, an oil-based (alkyd) paint is tough to beat. But you must be willing to put up with the strong odor and solvent cleanup, along with a longer drying and curing time than you’d get if you used an ordinary water-based paint. Plus, the color may yellow over time.
The best paint for cabinets solution to avoid the hassle of oil-based paint is a new-technology waterborne acrylic enamel paint. This type of paint delivers:
  • Good flow
  • Leveling
  • Hardening characteristics of oil-based paint without the odor and long drying time.
  • These new paints dry fast and clean up with soap and water.
The main challenge with waterborne acrylic enamel paint is a smooth finish, but pros say that if the waterborne acrylic enamel is applied heavily enough and worked in small sections, it will flatten out nicely. When painting kitchen cabinets, avoid a dry brush and going over sections already starting to dry. Check out these best-kept secrets of professional painters. These great ideas will produce a perfectly smooth and even paint job everytime. Don’t forget other keys to success when painting kitchen cabinets:
  • Surface preparation (degreasing, cleaning and sanding)
  • Priming (use a top-quality primer)
  • Brushing (use the best-quality brush for the type of paint)
  • Drying (follow label directions).
 
Read more...

7 Things to Do Before Listing Your Home This Spring

As the snow starts to melt, revealing the brightly colored flowers of crocus, and robins bop merrily around the yard, another cycle of the real estate market begins. If you’re considering listing your home this year, it’s definitely not too late to get started. March and April can be great months for putting your house in front of prospective buyers, but the summer months are also great times to sell.Regardless of your timing, there are a few things you need to do right now to start getting ready to list. It’s not as simple as sticking a sign in the yard and waiting for the calls to roll in.

Putting Your Best Foot Forward

You never know who will feel that special feeling people get when they find the house that is just right for them. But you can turn the odds in your favor if you and your home are both show ready long before you open up to potential buyers. Before you sell your house, you’re going to want to run through this checklist. Hire a Realtor. There’s a reason that 91 percent of home sellers used a real estate agent to sell their home in 2017: selling a home is a complicated process that really demands an expert. Just like you’d not try to DIY surgery, there are serious financial risks involved with selling your home without an education in real estate law. In addition to being your safety net, a Realtor can point out items that you might not realize are big turn-offs to buyers, like dated lighting, so you can get started on the cosmetic stuff to make your home show at its best. Have a home inspection. Wait. Isn’t a home inspection just for buying a house? No! You can have a home inspector out any time you want. Having a full blown home inspection before you put your house on the market gives you a chance to correct items that will likely come up for your future buyer when they have their home inspector out. Get ahead of issues and you’ll sell that house faster. Get to decluttering. If you have to sell your home in order to buy the next, you’re going to be living in a showroom for the next few months. Take anything you don’t really need immediately and put it in a storage unit. Get it away from your house because pushing clutter around doesn’t really help anything. Declutter as much as you can bear to — it’ll make your house look bigger and more appealing to prospective buyers Paint the front door. Your Realtor will probably drive home the importance of curb appeal, or how enticing your house is from the street (the curb). The better the curb appeal, the more likely potential buyers will come inside and look around. The interesting thing about curb appeal is how certain elements of your house affect the whole picture. Case in point, Zillow’s 2018 Paint Color Analysis found that a black or charcoal colored front door can bring in as much as $6,271 extra! Spruce up the landscaping. Along with dressing the front of your house up a bit, make sure that your landscaping is up to par. Prune any unruly plants, replace perennials that may have patchy growth, refresh your mulch, give the lawn a mow. Now that your landscape is radiating amazing curb appeal, keep it that way until your home closes. If you need to hire a landscaper, consider it an investment. Get copies of your utility bills. People will ask what kind of utility costs are associated with your home. Does it just burn through the natural gas? Does the electricity use seem excessive? This is another place where you can get ahead of potential buyers by putting this information together and giving it to your Realtor on the day you sign your listing agreement. Deep clean like you’ve never cleaned before. And hey, maybe you haven’t, we’re not here to judge. Even though painting is a quick fix to renewing your home’s interior, deep cleaning is less expensive and can result in a better overall effect. For example, if you clean your windows, inside and out until they’re super clean, you’ll immediately notice how much more natural light penetrates the room.

Is There Time For All of That?

If you find yourself crunched for time, don’t make up for it by skipping important things before listing. Instead, call on your HomeKeepr community to help you find the people who can move your home sale along. Whether you need a cleaner, a landscaper, an organization expert or even a home inspector, we’ve got you covered. Your agent already has a list of recommended service providers who can help, let these experts free up some of your time as you get ready to sell.
Read more...

Popcorn Ceilings: What They Are, How to Get Rid of Them & Are They a Health Hazard?

Popcorn is great for lots of stuff. You can enjoy a big bucket with family and friends while at the movies, string it on a thread to give Christmas that old-fashioned touch and even turn it into questionable “treats” for Halloween. One place that it’s a lot less welcome is on the ceiling.Unfortunately, too many homes still have popcorn ceilings. They often create a lot more questions than they answer.

What Is a Popcorn Ceiling?

Back in the day, someone had a brilliant idea. What would happen if there was a cheaper alternative to meticulously applied plaster ceiling coating and decoration for homes? This person asked themselves. Well, that would be just lovely! And that person wasn’t wrong in concept. It was practice that turned out to really be the killer. Popcorn ceilings, the solution to the problem, are still around, largely haunting homes built between the 1930s and 1990s. The ceiling texture that oddly resembles cottage cheese far more than it does popcorn, was popular for its ease of application and, at the time, low maintenance requirement.

Popcorn Ceilings: The Kicker

Even if you don’t object to the generally dated appearance of a popcorn ceiling (hey, maybe retro’s your thing, we’re not judging), think twice before going all in because that house you’re looking at has one that’s still intact. So many popcorn ceilings contain some amount of friable asbestos that they are generally not a great idea to keep around. Even though popcorn ceiling mixtures containing asbestos were banned under the Clean Air Act in 1979, the remaining mixes that hadn’t been purchased were still allowed to be sold. In some areas, this means that new installations of potentially hazardous popcorn ceilings lingered well into the 1980s. If the asbestos wasn’t enough, many popcorn ceilings have been painted since they were installed, or were installed using paint as part of the initial mix. Lead-based paint was the norm until it was banned in 1978. It’s kind of a double-whammy.

Friable Versus Non-Friable Asbestos

There are two kinds of asbestos: friable and non-friable. Friable asbestos is the most dangerous kind, since any amount of disturbance can result in particles floating around in the air and being inhaled. This is not good news. Risks of free-floating asbestos can range from lung scarring to mesothelioma, an insidious and heartbreaking form of cancer. This is the kind in popcorn ceilings. While non-friable asbestos isn’t a picnic, it’s a lot safer because the asbestos is encapsulated within another material. For example, older homes often have siding made of cement fiber-board tiles. These often contain asbestos, but unless you’re cutting the tiles, it’s safely contained. There are very specific laws about dealing with both types of asbestos, but those surrounding friable asbestos are as much about protecting humans around the material as the environment. In most areas, homeowners are legally allowed to remove popcorn ceilings from their own homes, but it’s still a really good idea to at least have a test for asbestos before you try it.

Before You Even Think About Scraping That Ceiling

There are few things easier than removing a popcorn ceiling. A scraper and a lot of time will do the job, but the hazard to someone who goes in blindly cannot be understated. So, before you even think about scraping that ceiling, take some samples. Carefully. Send one to a lab for testing for asbestos. Send another for testing for lead based paint (or use a high-quality at-home test kit). Wait until you have results to move forward. If you test positive for either or both, consider calling in a pro. They have all the right equipment to ensure that asbestos doesn’t get loose in your home, where you, your family and your pets will be at risk of exposure. If you DIY this one, do not skimp on ventilators and other filters to keep any friable asbestos contained.

This is Definitely One for Your HomeKeepr Community

Usually, easy jobs are a slam dunk for DIY, but when it comes to one that can create such a significant risk to health and home, it’s really best to call on a home pro with the right kind of equipment to keep everyone safe. Your HomeKeepr community is full of people who can help you with your popcorn ceiling woes. They can even recommend someone who can refinish that ceiling if your removal contractor doesn’t handle both. Just log in and your real estate agent will be more than happy to point you in the right direction with a recommendation from their extensive network of home pros.
Read more...

Improving Attic Ventilation Installing soffit vents By Merle Henkenius of Today’s Homeowner

STEP TWO // Improving Attic Ventilation

Cut parallel lines

cutting the two parallel lines with a portable circular saw
PHOTO BY MERLE HENKENIUS
Next, bore a 3⁄4- or 1-in.-dia. hole through the soffit right between the lines and measure the thickness of the soffit panel (probably 1⁄4 or 3⁄8 in.). Then set your circular saw to that depth and cut along the chalk lines. Cut the two parallel lines with a portable circular saw. Set the blade depth to barely cut through the thin soffit material.

Connect the two cuts

connecting the two cuts with a sharp chisel
PHOTO BY MERLE HENKENIUS
When you near the end of the soffit, stop short and connect the two cuts with a sharp chisel or sabre saw. Once all cuts are made, use a thin pry bar to remove the 2-in. plywood strip. Pull any nails that remain in the soffit framing with a cat's paw. Then inspect the length of the vent cutout. If there's any insulation clogging the slot, pull it out or shove it back up.

Raise the vent up to the soffit

raising the vent up to the soffit and center it over the cutout slot
PHOTO BY MERLE HENKENIUS
Next, lay the strip vent down on a flat wood surface, such as a plywood sheet or long 2 x 4, and drill 1⁄8-in.-dia. screw holes through both flanges. Space the holes 12 to 14 in. apart. With the help of an assistant, raise the vent up to the soffit and center it over the cutout slot.

Attach the vent to the soffit

using a cordless drill/driver to secure the vent to the soffit
PHOTO BY MERLE HENKENIUS
Use a cordless drill/driver to secure the vent to the soffit with ½-in.-long No. 4 sheet-metal screws. Continue installing additional strip vents until you reach the far end. Trim the last vent to length using aviation snips.

Remove any insulation from the new vent

raking back blown-in insulation from the new soffit vent
PHOTO BY MERLE HENKENIUS
The soffit vents are now installed, but you still need to make sure there's no insulation blocking the new vents. If the attic is insulated with fiberglass batts, just pull back any that are blocking the flow of air. If there's blown-in insulation, like ours, rake back the fluffy stuff with a 3- or 4-ft.-long 1 x 6, or use a garden rake or hoe.

Install the ventilation baffle

stapling a ventilation baffle to the plywood sheathing
PHOTO BY MERLE HENKENIUS

Finally, to ensure that the airway to the vent remains open, staple a ventilation baffle to the plywood sheathing in each rafter bay. The molded polystyrene baffles, available at home centers and lumberyards for about $1 each, form channels that hold insulation at bay and direct incoming air upward.

Read more...

How to Build a Rustic Headboard By Thomas Baker of This Old House magazine

SKILL: MODERATE
While the mattress is the key to a bed’s comfort, the headboard is what defines its style. Case in point: this handsome planked headboard, which evokes the warmth and historical character of a stable in an old barn. This is an easy, straightforward project to build. Working together, TOH general contractor Tom Silva and TOH host Kevin O’Connor managed to complete it in just a few hours, using materials readily available at many home centers. The base is a sheet of ½-inch birch plywood backed by 2x4s, and the rough-sawn boards covering the plywood are stained, kiln-dried poplar from Weaber Lumber. Conveniently packed in boxes, these weathered wallboards are free of the bugs, fungi, and peeling paint that you might find in boards actually salvaged from abandoned barns. Because the poplar pieces don’t line up perfectly edge to edge, Tom painted the plywood black to make any gaps look like shadows.
STEP ONE // How to Build a Rustic Headboard

Overview

rough sawn headboard overview illustration
ILLUSTRATION BY DOUG ADAMS
Tom and Kevin take you step-by-step through the entire building process. If you like what you see, consider giving it a shot. You may soon find yourself dozing off beneath your own handmade headboard.
Read more...

January is Radon Awareness Month

Radon Inspection Rogers, Radon Inspection Brainerd, Radon Inspection St. Michael, Home Inspector Rogers, Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Brainerd, Home Inspection Brainerd, Certified Home Inspector Rogers, Certified Home Inspector Brainerd, Buyers Home Inspection Rogers, Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd

The danger of radon gas in our homes

Radon, a naturally-occurring radioactive gas that causes cancer, can build up to unsafe levels in any home at any time of year. With many Americans spending more time inside their homes during January, however, there is no better time to make sure our homes are radon-free.  That is why EPA starts every new year encouraging Americans to get their homes tested for radon.  (re-post courtesy of the National Association of Realtors, https://www.nar.realtor/washington-report/january-is-radon-awareness-month). “If a high radon level is found, the good news is that this serious environmental risk can be reduced by using simple, proven techniques comparable to the cost of other minor home repair or improvement projects,” said Bill Wehrum, Assistant Administrator of EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. Millions of homes in the United States have elevated levels of radon. Because radon gas is invisible and odorless, the only way to know if a house, school or other building has a radon problem is to get the building tested. Although testing for radon is easy and inexpensive, only one in five homeowners has tested their homes for radon. EPA and states are encouraging Americans to test their homes for radon and to fix elevated levels during January as a common-sense step to prevent lung cancer.

Radon gas in the home is more common than most people think, and it can enter a home through many different openings. We’ll check your:

  • Floor Drains
  • Sump pump openings
  • Pores in the walls and concrete
  • Well water
  • Wall and floor joints in basements
Don’t delay in testing your home during National Radon Action Month. A simple and low-cost radon test can help save a life in your family. For radon or a complete home inspection, don't hesitate to contact Home Detective today. Home Detective is certified by over 4 leading trade organizations as a home inspection expert, with rigorous knowledge and experience requirements that a jack of all trades can’t possibly offer, such as the Midwest Association of Home Inspectors (MAHI)American Home Inspection Training (AHIT)American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), and the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). These certifications along with years of experience will ensure you have peace of mind after you purchase your home.  In addition to our credentials, Home Detective offers a Free 90 Day Warranty for all the home inspections we do with the option for an 18 month extended warranty. To schedule your home inspection today or for more information, contact Reed at (763) 434-3155.  Home Inspector Rogers | Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers | Home Inspection Rogers | Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers | Home Inspection for Sellers Brainerd | Home Inspection Brainerd | Certified Home Inspector Rogers | Certified Home Inspector Brainerd | Buyers Home Inspection Rogers | Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd | Radon Inspection Rogers | Radon Inspection Brainerd | Radon Inspection St. Michael  
Read more...

Energy Efficient Way to Better Indoor Air Quality

Home Inspector Rogers, Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Brainerd, Home Inspection Brainerd

Good Air Quality Reduces Allergies

According to the EPA, indoor air quality inside a home is typically 5 times worse than outdoor air quality. New technologies have been developed for indoor air exchangers (sometimes called heat recovery ventilators or energy recovery ventilators), which can give you all the benefits of having open windows, but without losing all of the energy. We’ve all heard about the problems of air pollution in the environment, but most people are shocked to find out that the air quality in their own homes is actually a much greater problem. There are a number of reasons why the air quality in your home is so much worse than outside air:
  • VOC (volatile organic chemicals) being released from carpets and furniture.
  • fumes from household cleaners and paints.
  • mold from damp bathrooms and basements.
  • naturally occurring radon gas which seeps up through the foundation floors.
  • fumes from cooking and smoking.
  • pet dander.
To improve the quality of air in your home, you can open your windows. But of course, in the wintertime, you will not want to do this. And in the summertime, you will not want to open your windows when you are running your air conditioner. This is where an indoor air exchanger can be so helpful. By bringing in fresh outdoor air while capturing up to 80%
Certified Home Inspector Rogers, Certified Home Inspector Brainerd, Buyers Home Inspection Rogers, Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd, Radon Inspector Rogers, Radon Inspector St. Michael, Radon Inspector Brainerd

Air Exchanger

of the potential heat loss, these units can significantly improve your indoor air quality in an energy efficient manner. And models which are energy recovery ventilators can actually transfer the humidity between the air streams, keeping the humidity in your house when you need it in the winter, and keeping humidity out in the summertime when you don’t want it. You can see examples of various models of indoor air exchangers online on Amazon.com: indoor air exchangers. As you will see, the prices for the units can range from about $350 to $1,400, depending on the style, capacity, features, etc. And then you will need to add the costs of the installation. Further, in addition to the initial cost of installing the unit, there are also the operating costs for electricity and routine maintenance. Electricity costs will vary according to the size of the unit you get and your local electric rates. For some models, the energy use can be as low as about 60 watts (about the same as an average light bulb), but of course, you can be saving 900 watts of heat that would have been lost through an open window. Some models of air exchangers can be mounted in a window or wall opening, much like a room air conditioner is installed. These are designed to handle the ventilation for an individual room, such as a kitchen, living room, work studio, etc. Larger units are designed for the whole house and provide fresh air to all the rooms of your home. These larger units are easier to install if you have central heating or air conditioning ductwork to which the units can be connected. Your choice of air exchanger will depend on factors such as:
  • the volume of air exchange you need for your home.
  • the configuration of your home’s ductwork.
  • the humidity of the region of the country where you live.
  • how tight the construction is of your home.

HOW THEY WORK

As shown in the diagram here, the way an indoor air exchanger works is that the air ducts for the intake air are intertwined with the air duct for the outflow air in the mixing chamber. As a result, the air flows do not mix, but the heat (or cooling in the summer) from the two air flows are exchanged. As a result, fresh air from the outside can come in without losing all of the heat (or cooling) from the inside air, thereby saving up to 80% of the energy. The key elements of a typical air exchanger include:

Air Ports

: From one port, fresh air is drawn from the outside, and from the other port, indoor air is ducted and expelled out.

Exchanger:

The exchanger is a chamber where the separate air channels mix while separated from each other by highly conductive metal, which allows efficient heat transfer between the two air streams.

Filter:

A material made of foam, metal, etc. which removes dust and dirt particles from the outside air intake.

Damper:

A flat blade inside the air exchanger, which controls the amount of airflow.

Ductwork:

Channels in your house where the air flows through.

Drain pan:

A reservoir here water condensation is collected.

Condensate pump:

If the air exchanger is located in a basement below grade, then it will need a pump to eject the water condensate.

WHAT CAN TYPICALLY GO WRONG:

Most of the problems with an air exchanger can be related to humidity. If you do not have the right size or type of unit for your particular home and weather environment, you can find problems such as:
  • The air exchanger will not turn on often enough, because it is limited by the humidity of the outside air.
  • The unit is undersized for the volume of air in your home.
Other typical problems are poor unit efficiency and motor failure, which can be a result of not doing the proper routine maintenance.

ROUTINE MAINTENANCE:

Routine maintenance for an air exchanger will, of course, depend on the specific model that you have. But typical maintenance tasks for an air exchanger will include washing or replacing the filters on a regular basis, cleaning the exchanger chamber, and ensuring that the vents are clear and operating properly.

SUMMARY

If you are buying or selling a home, Home Detective can help you determine the air quality for peace of mind.  If you need a solution, indoor air exchangers are a great innovation for improving the quality of air in your home for you and your family, on an energy efficient basis. However, you will want to carefully choose which model is appropriate for your particular home situation, and if you already have one, you will want to do the proper routine maintenance for it. Home Detective is certified by over 4 leading trade organizations as a home inspection expert, with rigorous knowledge and experience requirements that a jack of all trades can’t possibly offer, such as the Midwest Association of Home Inspectors (MAHI)American Home Inspection Training (AHIT)American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), and the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). These certifications along with years of experience will ensure you have peace of mind after you purchase your home.  In addition to our credentials, Home Detective offers a Free 90 Day Warranty for all the home inspections we do with the option for an 18 month extended warranty. To schedule your home inspection today or for more information, contact Reed at (763) 434-3155. Home Inspector Rogers | Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers | Home Inspection Rogers | Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers | Home Inspection for Sellers Brainerd | Home Inspection Brainerd | Certified Home Inspector Rogers | Certified Home Inspector Brainerd | Buyers Home Inspection Rogers | Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd
Read more...

Carbon Monoxide Detector Placement: Where to Place CO Alarms in Your Home

Home Inspector Rogers, Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers BrainerdCarbon monoxide alarms help save lives every day.  Learn what they do, how to install them, and where you should place CO detectors. (This is a re-post courtesy of https://www.safety.com/carbon-monoxide-detector-placement).

What is carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is known as the “silent killer” because it is odorless, tasteless and colorless.  It’s also toxic since the gas can prevent your body from properly transporting oxygen. If inhaled in high concentrations, carbon monoxide poisoning can happen quickly; it can also occur slowly if toxic gas levels build up slowly over time.

What are the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning?

People who have been exposed to carbon monoxide experience a range of symptoms that may include headaches,
Home Inspection Brainerd, Certified Home Inspector Rogers, Certified Home Inspector Brainerd, Buyers Home Inspection Rogers, Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd

Carbon Monoxide is a "silent killer" because it is odorless.

confusion, drowsiness, dizziness, burning eyes and loss of consciousness. An acute case can result in brain damage and death. Note that children, seniors and people who have pre-existing respiratory or heart conditions are often more sensitive to the effects of carbon monoxide.

What are possible sources of carbon monoxide in my home?

Carbon monoxide is a natural by-product of many home appliances. If you use charcoal, gasoline, kerosene, wood, propane, natural gas or heating oil to create energy or heat – hot water heaters, grills, furnaces, fireplaces, stoves, room heaters, etc. – then there is potential for carbon monoxide in your home. It’s important to have these products installed by a professional, since proper installation, ventilation, and maintenance will reroute any carbon monoxide emissions out of your home to keep your family safe.

What are carbon monoxide alarms?

Carbon monoxide detectors, also known as CO alarms, function similarly to smoke alarms. If carbon monoxide levels are present in your home, the detector will emit a sharp beeping sound to alert you to the danger. Like smoke alarms, it is important to change your CO detector batteries regularly; I like to schedule new batteries for Daylight Savings time change since they make it easy to remember this twice-yearly swap.
Home Inspection Brainerd, Certified Home Inspector Rogers, Certified Home Inspector Brainerd, Buyers Home Inspection Rogers, Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd, Carbon Monoxide Detector Rogers, Carbon Monoxide Detector St. Michael, Carbon Monoxide Detector Brainerd

It is preferable to install a Carbon Monoxide Detector at knee level

How do I install a carbon monoxide alarm?

Heat and smoke rise, which is why we place smoke alarms high on the wall or ceiling. Carbon monoxide, however, mixes with the air. For this reason, it is preferable to install CO alarms at knee level – the approximate height of a sleeping person’s nose and mouth. If you have young children or pets that could tamper (play) with your detectors, you can move them up to chest height. Another option is to place them in a hard-to-reach area, where even curious hands and overzealous tails would have a hard time reaching. Bear in mind that a CO detector should never be blocked by furniture, curtains or other objects, as restricted airflow can affect its function.

Where should I place carbon monoxide detectors in my home?

Since we are most vulnerable to the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning while we sleep, it is important to place
Home Inspector Rogers, Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers, Home Inspection for Sellers Brainerd

Suggested Locations

alarms near your family’s bedrooms. If you only have one CO alarm, place it as close to everyone’s sleeping area as possible. Ideally, you should have carbon monoxide detectors placed throughout your home, as you do smoke alarms. You should place a CO detector in each major area of your home: in the kitchen, in your living/dining room, in your bedrooms, and the office. If you have children or elderly family members living with you, provide extra protection near their rooms. If you live in a multi-story home, be sure to place at least one carbon monoxide detector on each level. If your furnace is located in the basement, be sure to place a CO detector there, as well. Likewise, if you have a gas clothes dryer, put an alarm in the laundry room. Place one in the garage, if you park your cars there. Wherever you have a solid fuel-fired appliance – anything that could produce carbon monoxide – you should also have a CO alarm. For more information on the TOP 5 Highest Rated Carbon Monoxide Detectors, visit https://www.safety.com/carbon-monoxide-detector-placement. In addition to checking carbon monoxide detectors, Home Detective will also inspect fire detectors to ensure they are in proper working order for peace of mind. Home Detective is certified by over 4 leading trade organizations as a home inspection expert, with rigorous knowledge and experience requirements that a jack of all trades can’t possibly offer, such as the Midwest Association of Home Inspectors (MAHI)American Home Inspection Training (AHIT)American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), and the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). These certifications along with years of experience will ensure you have peace of mind after you purchase your home.  In addition to our credentials, Home Detective offers a Free 90 Day Warranty for all the home inspections we do with the option for an 18 month extended warranty. To schedule your home inspection today or for more information, contact Reed at (763) 434-3155.  Home Inspector Rogers | Pre-listing Home Inspection Rogers | Home Inspection Rogers | Home Inspection for Sellers Rogers | Home Inspection for Sellers Brainerd | Home Inspection Brainerd | Certified Home Inspector Rogers | Certified Home Inspector Brainerd | Buyers Home Inspection Rogers | Buyers Home Inspection Brainerd
Read more...